Conference: ‘Retailing and Distribution before 1600’

The conference on:

‘Retailing and Distribution before 1600’

will take place at the University of Wolverhampton

on 15 September 2016

The programme, together with abstracts, registration details and further information, can be found at:

http://home.wlv.ac.uk/~in6086/conf2016.htm

The programme includes:

Graham Barton, University of Gloucestershire, UK
Images of roman retailers

Market scene

Anon., Netherlandish, 16th century, The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, 1959, The Metroplotan Museum of Art. Image courtesy of http://www.metmuseum.org

Stuart Brookes, UCL Institute of Archaeology, UK
Reassessing the transport geography of early medieval England

Luca Clerici, University of Padova, Italy & École Normale Supérieure, Paris, France
Provisioning the marketplace: shoppers, hucksters, and direct sellers in early modern Italy (Vicenza, sixteenth century)

Emilie Fiorucci, European University Institute, Italy
Disciplining trade: the statutes of the Venetian mercers’ guild in the 16th century

Zoe Hudson, University of Kent, UK
The Shopping Networks of Richard Stonley

Una McIlvenna, University of Kent, UK
The street singer of news in early modern Europe

Eljas Oksanen, Portable Antiquities Scheme, British Museum, UK
Medieval Markets and Fairs seen through the Portable Antiquities Scheme Data

Mark Page, Victoria County History of Oxfordshire, UK
Who were the shopkeepers of medieval England?

Bethany Pleydell, University of Bristol, UK
‘A most necessary forreyne commodytie for the lande’: Spanish Leather Exports for an English Market, c.1554-1600

Catherine Richardson, University of Kent, UK
‘buy mee a close stoole at london’: domestic shopping between London and the provinces

Martin Roberts, independent researcher and consultant on the Pewter Wreck project, UK
The Overseas Trade of London’s Pewterers in the first half of the 16th Century – evidence from shipwrecks and the archives.

Tabitha Stanmore, University of Bristol / University of Exeter, UK
Make it rain: cunning folk and the sale of magical services in England, 1350-1650

Kate Kelsey Staples, West Virginia University, US
Materiality and Meaning: Goods as Legal and Cultural Currency

Philip Tromans, De Montfort University, UK
Inside Elizabethan Bookshops

Paul Williams, University of Exeter, UK
Shop Fines in Early Tudor Exeter

The conference will be held at the University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton City Campus.

The fee is £22.

Registration is available HERE

The link will take you to the University of Wolverhampton’s e-store: http://www.estore.wlv.ac.uk/browse/product.asp?compid=1&modid=1&catid=380

For further information, please see the conference web-pages, at

http://home.wlv.ac.uk/~in6086/conf2016.htm

Or contact Laura Ugolini, at: L.Ugolini@wlv.ac.uk

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Workshop: Frills and Furbelows? Textile Ornamentation and Dress Adornment in Museums and Historic Houses

The CHORD (Centre for the History of Retailing and Distribution) workshop on:

Frills and Furbelows? Textile Ornamentation and Dress Adornment in Museums and Historic Houses

will take place at the University of Wolverhampton

on

9 June 2016

The programme, together with abstracts, registration details and further information, can be found at:

http://home.wlv.ac.uk/~in6086/textiles2016.htm

Met1

Passementerie, early 19th century, possibly French, Silk and metal thread, 14.0 x 7.6 cm, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 20.82.18. Gift of Miss Harriet Abbe, 1920. Image courtesy of http://www.metmuseum.org

The programme includes:

Kate Strasdin, Falmouth University, ‘Forgotten Ephemera: the Hidden Histories of Late 19th Century Embellishment’

Jenni Dixon, Birmingham City University, ‘Beautiful Ingenuity: Luckcock’s Buttons and Male Display in the Eighteenth-Century’

Anthea Harris, University of Birmingham, ‘ “Coptic” Ornamental Textiles in the Care of the Ure Museum, Reading’

Naomi Bailey-Cooper, London College of Fashion, University of the Arts London, ‘How can embellishment deliver an alternative to the decorative and seductive notion of exotic animal materials?’

Rosamund Weatherall, National Trust Textile Conservation Studio, ‘Investigation and revelation: The documentation and conservation of the hangings of the Spangled Bed from Knole, Sevenoaks, Kent’

Anna Sznajder, ‘Linking communities through travelling textile craft collections – Bobbin lacemakers from Central and Eastern Europe’

Mark Wallis, ‘War & Peace’

Alison Toplis, University of Wolverhampton, ‘Rural Embellishment: Smock Frock Case Histories’

The workshop will be held in room MC413, Millennium City Building, University of Wolverhampton.

The fee is £16.

For further information and to register, please see the workshop web-pages, at: http://home.wlv.ac.uk/~in6086/textiles2016.htm

Or contact Laura Ugolini, at: L.Ugolini@wlv.ac.uk

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WORKSHOP – Retailing, Distribution and the Family: Historical Approaches

Figure cropped

University of Wolverhampton

24 May 2016

The programme, together with abstracts, registration details and further information, can be found at:

http://home.wlv.ac.uk/~in6086/family.htm

The programme includes:

Clare Weston, Black Country Living Museum, UK, ‘More than just Bricks and Produce: Uncovering the family stories within the recreated shops at the Black Country Living Museum, Dudley’

Rika Fujioka, Kansai University, Japan, ‘The transition from communitarian management to modern management in Japanese department stores’

Michael Wortmann, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Germany, ‘Transformations of family ownership in German grocery retailing’

Sylvain Leteux, IRHIS – Lille 3 – France, ‘The butcher’s wife: the role of the spouse in the French butcher’s retail business (1789 to 1945)’

Katrina Maitland-Brown, University of Wolverhampton, UK, ‘Mistress of the House: the role of retailing in the creation of women’s autonomy’

Breda Scott, Maynooth University, Ireland, ‘ “… one star of St. Patrick, one Masonic bible, one gold brooch”: jewellery supply networks in nineteenth-century Dublin’

Alison Clarke, University of Liverpool and National Gallery, UK, ‘Agnew’s, Family Art Dealers: Private vs. Public’

Alyssa Kariofyllis, University of Connecticut, US, ‘The Abigail Whitneys, A Mother-Daughter Company in Pre-Revolutionary Boston’

Catherine Talbot, University of Exeter, UK, ‘Selling to the Family: Exploring Interactions Between Consumers and Suppliers in Eighteenth Century Bristol and Boston’

The workshop will take place in room Room MC331, Millennium City Building, University of Wolverhampton.

The fee is £16

For further information and to register, please see the workshop web-pages, at:
http://home.wlv.ac.uk/~in6086/family.htm

Or contact Laura Ugolini, at: L.Ugolini@wlv.ac.uk

 

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CHORD Conference and Call for Papers: Retailing and Distribution before 1600

Thursday 15 September 2016

University of Wolverhampton

CHORD invites submissions for a conference that explores retailing and distribution before 1600.

Papers focusing on any pre-1600 period (including papers based archaeology) or geographical area are welcome. We invite both experienced and new speakers, including speakers without an institutional affiliation. Potential speakers are welcome to discuss their ideas with the organiser before submission (please see details below). Some of the themes that  might be considered include (but are not limited to):

  • Itinerant and fixed-premises selling
  • Distribution, material culture and archaeology
  • Representations and perceptions of retailers
  • Selling, religion and magic
  • The relationship between craft, manufacture and selling
  • Distribution channels and transport
  • Exchange and ritual
  • Fairs and markets
  • Novel and old commodities, luxuries and the everyday
  • Institutions, politics and corporate structures
  • The impact of wars and conflict
Market scene

Anonymous, Netherlandish, 16th century, The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, the Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 1959, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Image courtesy of http://www.metmuseum.org

To submit a proposal:

Individual papers are usually 20 minutes in length, followed by 10 minutes for questions and discussion. We also welcome shorter, 10 minute ‘work in progress’ presentations.

Please send title and abstract of c.300 to 400 words, specifying whether you are proposing a 10 or a 20 minute presentation to Laura Ugolini, at l.ugolini@wlv.ac.uk by 8 April 2016.

If you are unsure whether to submit a proposal or would like to discuss your ideas, please e-mail Laura Ugolini at l.ugolini@wlv.ac.uk

The Conference will be held on Wolverhampton City Campus, University of Wolverhampton, a short walk from Wolverhampton’s bus and train stations.

For further information, please e-mail Laura Ugolini at: l.ugolini@wlv.ac.uk

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Workshop and Call for Papers – Retailing, Distribution and the Family: Historical Approaches

Tuesday 24 May 2016

University of Wolverhampton

Figure cropped

Call for Papers

The Centre for the History of Retailing and Distribution invites submissions for a workshop that explores the role of the family in retailing and distribution.

Papers focusing on any historical period or geographical area are welcome. We invite both experienced and new speakers, including speakers without an institutional affiliation. Potential speakers are welcome to discuss their ideas with the organiser before submission (please see details below). Some of the themes that  might be considered include (but are not limited to):

  • Family businesses and enterprises.
  • Selling to the family.The family in retail advertising and marketing.
  • Retailing, distribution, households and extended families.
  • The family in distribution networks and channels.
  • Retailing, distribution and family labour.
  • Inheritance, legacy and generational change.
  • Fictional and factual representations of the family in retailing and distribution.

To submit a proposal:

Individual papers are usually 20 minutes in length, followed by 10 minutes for questions and discussion. We also welcome shorter, 10 minute ‘work in progress’ presentations.

Please send title and abstract of c.300 to 400 words, specifying whether you are proposing a 10 or a 20 minute presentation to Laura Ugolini, at l.ugolini@wlv.ac.uk by 4 March 2016.

If you are unsure whether to submit a proposal or would like to discuss your ideas, please e-mail Laura Ugolini at l.ugolini@wlv.ac.uk

Information:

The workshop will be held on Wolverhampton City Campus, University of Wolverhampton, a short walk from Wolverhampton’s bus and train stations.

For maps and directions see: http://www.wlv.ac.uk/default.aspx?page=6856

For further information, please e-mail Laura Ugolini at: l.ugolini@wlv.ac.uk

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Workshop and Call for Papers: Frills and Furbelows? Textile Ornamentation and Dress Adornment in Museums and Historic Houses

Thursday 9 June 2016
University of Wolverhampton

Call for Papers

Met1
Passementerie, early 19th century, possibly French, Silk and metal thread, 14.0 x 7.6 cm,The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 20.82.18. Gift of Miss Harriet Abbe, 1920. Image courtesy of http://www.metmuseum.org

 

CHORD invites submissions for a workshop that explores ornamentation and adornment – both textiles and dress – in the collections of museums and historic houses.

Papers focusing on any historical period or geographical area are welcome. Museum professionals, conservators, students, academics or anybody with an interest in the topic are warmly invited to submit a proposal. We welcome both experienced and new speakers, including speakers without an institutional affiliation.

Potential speakers are welcome to discuss their ideas with the organiser before submission (please see details below). Some of the themes that  might be considered include (but are not limited to):

§ The care, display and interpretation of … trimmings, passementerie, tassels, fringes, antimacassars…

§ The role of textile and dress ornamentations in museum and historic house displays.

§ The craft, conservation, repair and care of ‘frills and furbelows’.

§ Furnishings, ‘soft’ goods and textile ornaments in the recreation of historic interiors, exteriors and gardens.

§ Dress and textile ornamentations in portraits, representations, monuments and effigies.

§ The care, display and interpretation of handkerchiefs, pockets, ribbons, hat trimmings, medal ribbons…

§ The biography of ornaments, from production to incorporation in museum or historic house collections.

§ ‘Frills and furbelows’ in gift shops and cafes.

To submit a proposal:

Please send title and abstract of c.300 to 400 words to Laura Ugolini, at l.ugolini@wlv.ac.uk by 11 March 2016.

Individual papers are usually 20 minutes in length, followed by 10 minutes for questions and discussion. We also welcome shorter, 10 minute presentations, which might focus on a specific collection, new project or work in progress.

If you are unsure whether to submit a proposal or would like to discuss your ideas, please e-mail Laura Ugolini at l.ugolini@wlv.ac.uk

Small bursaries will be available for speakers to subsidise the cost of travel (within the UK) and the workshop fee.

Information:

The workshop will be held on Wolverhampton City Campus, University of Wolverhampton, a short walk from Wolverhampton’s bus and train stations.

For maps and directions see:

http://www.wlv.ac.uk/default.aspx?page=6856.

For further information, please e-mail Laura Ugolini at:

l.ugolini@wlv.ac.uk

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Conference: ‘Retailing and Distribution History’

Image with both figures
The conference on

‘Retailing and Distribution History’

will take place at the University of Wolverhampton

on 10 September 2015

The programme, together with abstracts, registration details and further information, can be found at:

http://home.wlv.ac.uk/~in6086/conf2015.htm

The programme includes:

Christine Atha, University of Leeds,
Shopping in the design museum: curating, collecting and shopping for design

Emily Baines, De Montfort University
Concentrating on Fashion: the home market retail and distribution structure for British dress textiles 1919-40

Lucy Bailey, University of Northampton and Jon Stobart, Manchester Metropolitan University
Taking a long look at the English village shop

Bruno Blondé, University of Antwerp and Jon Stobart, Manchester Metropolitan University
The language of value: a comparative approach to newspaper advertisements for auctions of second-hand household goods in eighteenth-century England and the Low Countries

Rika Fujioka, Kansai University
The development of Japanese department stores along with the growing ready-made clothes market from the 1950s to the 1970s

Janina Gosseye, Delft University of Technology
The Janus-faced suburban shopping centre: the Low Countries in search of a suitable shopping paradigm

Graham Harding, St Cross College, Oxford
Competition is useless: Gilbey’s and the emergence of modern retailing, 1855-1914

Richard Hawkins, University of Wolverhampton and Hildegard Norton-Uhl, University of Wolverhampton
Paprika Schlesinger: The Development of a Luxury Retail Shoe Brand in Belle Époque Vienna

Clare Hoare, King’s College London
Female business owners: a study of grocers in Edwardian London

Jennifer Holt,
Retailing and wholesaling c 1600: a Lune Valley case study

Ulla Ijäs, University of Turku
English consumer goods in nineteenth-century St. Petersburg and its environs

Sarah Laurenson, University of Edinburgh
‘In enclose herewith five compasses’: retailing jewellery and small luxuries in rural Scotland during the long nineteenth century

Lucile Peytavin, University of Lyon 2
Female haberdashers and haberdashers in La Motte-de-Galaure and in the north of Drome in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries

Martin Purvis, University of Leeds
Retailing in English suburbs during the 1920s and 1930s: development, deficiency and diversity

Gabi Schopf, Universität Bern
Buying and selling consumer goods in the eighteenth century: rural retailing in the Canton of Bern

Pol Serrahima i Balius, Universitat de Lleida
Urban grain markets and suburban agrarian communities: Barcelona and its surroundings in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries

Shelley Tickell, University of Hertfordshire
Selecting shops to steal from in the eighteenth century metropolis – which retailers were most vulnerable to shoplifting?

The conference will be held in the Millennium City Building, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton campus.

The fee is £26.

For further information and to register, please see the conference web-pages, at:

home.wlv.ac.uk/~in6086/conf2015.htm

Or contact Karin Dannehl at K.Dannehl@wlv.ac.uk or Laura Ugolini, at: L.Ugolini@wlv.ac.uk

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